Substance abuse and dating violence

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Recent national media attention has increased discussion regarding this significant health care issue. Definition and Background The Futures Without Violence Association (FWV) defines intimate partner violence (IPV) as “A pattern of assaultive and coercive behaviors that may include inflicted physical injury, psychological abuse, sexual assault, progressive social isolation, stalking, deprivation, intimidation and threats. The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 Summary Report. Interventions to prevent intimate partner violence.

In the United States, the vast majority of nonfatal intimate partner victimizations of women (66%) occur in the home.

Unfortunately, teen dating violence—the type of intimate partner violence that occurs between two young people who are, or who were once in, an intimate relationship—is a serious problem in the United States.

A national survey found that ten percent of teens, female and male, had been the victims of physical dating violence within the past year and can increase the risk of physical injury, poor academic performance, binge drinking, suicide attempts, unhealthy sexual behaviors, substance abuse, negative body image and self-esteem, and violence in future relationships.

Health Consequences of IPV “IPV is the leading cause of female homicides and injury-related deaths during pregnancy, and accounts for significant preventable injuries and ED visits by women,” (Intimate Partner Violence and Healthy People 2010 Fact Sheet).

A 2002 study by the US Department of Justice found that most victims injured by an intimate partner did not report seeking professional medical treatment for their injuries.

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